Welcome

If you were born in America with the name Dayton, there is a high probability that you descend from our common progenitor Ralph Dayton, my 8th great-grandfather. I descend from Ralph> Samuel> Abraham> Henry> David Senior> David Junior> Henry> Charles> Wilber (our grandfather).

My brother and I enjoy contact with extended family and like-minded friends, so this blog has been created in order that we might establish contact and prompt discussion. My current goal is to add a fresh post at least every 7-10 days.

Our decades of research have been gathered into a compilation of records and interpretation entitled Our Long Island Ancestors, the First Six Generations of Daytons in America, 1639-1807. The original intent was to preserve discoveries for the larger Dayton family in the form of a book that might read as a story.

The book is not for profit, with proceeds going to Long Island historical societies.
Special Note: Please be aware of a few malicious sites advertising PDF downloads of our book which do not exist. Do not open these dangerous sites.

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Posted in Daiton, Dayghton, Deighton, Drayton, Dyghton, Long Island, New Haven Colony, Ralph Dayton, Samuel Dayton | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Dunstable Curiosities

I’ve been looking again at Dunstable, a small town about 35 miles north of London, because I’m curious why Howell (1887), Burke, Whittemore (1897), and Mather (1913) among others, had the idea that Ralph and other American Daytons originated there. The period of interest in the search for Ralph’s parents is somewhere between 1560 to 1610, assuming that Ralph was born around 1588.

British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/beds/vol3/pp349-368 seems like a good place to start. More precisely, British History Online>Victoria County History>Bedfordshire>A History of the County of Bedford: Volume 3 Parishes: Dunstable. The registers previous to 1812 are in four books: (1) 1558 to 1749; (2) 1749 to 1812, marriages ending in 1754; (3) marriages 1754 to 1802; and (4) marriages 1802 to 1812.

Many Daytons are listed in Bedfordshire records for the time period of our search. Referring to Bedfordshire Parish Registers Volume XLII, Dunstable: 1558-1812 (1951) at https://archive.org/stream/bedfordshirepari42bedf/bedfordshirepari42bedf_djvu.txt , some baptisms include Christian Dyton in 1583, Eliz Dighton in 1588, Marian Dyton in 1589, Emery Dyton in 1593, Helen Dytonne baptized 1595 and most intriguing, a Ralph Dytonne baptized at Dunstable in 1580. There are also others listed under variants of “Dayton” so I imagine a more thorough search may uncover other interesting characters.

Some burials include an Alice Dyton in 1594, Emery Diton in 1601, Ralph Dighton in 1618, Alice Dyton (wife of Emery Dyton) in 1619, and also between 1591 and 1601 we find Rob Ditton and Alice Dytton in Cardington and Eliz Dyton, Alice Dyton and Jn Diton in Dunstable.

I should also mention that in a brief search, a place called “Dytonne” was discovered in Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, in the section called Recusant Roll for West Derby Hundred, 1641 on page 242 of the online copy. No attempt has yet been made to locate Dytonne.

Another resource Kent Online Parish Clerks; Dutch Refugees in Maidstone, 1585 (2013), claims that a Peter Daton and his wife were listed with Dutch refugees, described as “[a] stranger dwelling in Maidstone 1585.” Doesn’t that pique your interest?

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Not “very well fitted”

Perhaps someone can help me with your interpretation of  what is happening in the record below?

In Book 2, page 133 of the Records: Town of East-Hampton (1887), there is a deposition from September 25, 1665 that confounds me. There may be a more meaningful story here, if only I was able to more fully understand what is actually happening.

As best as I can grasp, Samuel Dayton and two other men are testifying that there was a debate involving the master of the ketch “Triall” and the merchant & freighters of the ketch. It appears to me that the vessel is already carrying some cargo and is about to be loaded with more freight but the merchant is hesitant to put his product on the vessel because he thinks it is not seaworthy. Am I correct?

The record says,

The Deposition of mr John Blackleech Mr John Osburne & Samuell Dayton Taken before me Testifieth as ffollowest That on the twenty third Day of this Instant Moneth there was a debate betwixt the Master of the Catch “Triall” Of Boston and the Merchant & ffraiters of the sd Catch she then Ridinge in the Roade of Easthampton at Ancor and she then not beinge very well fitted with masts sailes provisions and water whether she should goe to sea in the condition that then she was in or that she should land her goods at the port without Confiscation of goods or vessell [Book 2, page 132.] and in order there unto Answer was made by the Cunstable of the sd place by name Thomas Chatfield, that they might if they would willingly come a shore without being forced ashore she might as well come a shore at the sd place and Land her goods wth as much freedome as the whalemen might strike a whale, and bringe her ashore at the sd place and this to our best Remembrance he spoke at the prsent Instant., And afterwards we doe attest that on the twenty ffowerth of this prsent Moneth he did affirme the same in our hearinge whereupon this beinge an encoragement to the Merchant & ffraiters they under their hands gave the Master of the sd Catch an order to acte as they have Donne: Taken before me John Mulford.

What does the phrase “the said Ketch she then Riding in the Road of East Hampton at anchor” mean?

Does this mean that the vessel is docked at the port used by East Hampton, while its cargo is either coming or going on the road to East Hampton?

It appears that Justice John Mulford has sided with the East Hampton merchants and freighters, but why should the master be worried about confiscation of goods?

What is Samuel’s role in the exchange? Is he one of the “ffraiters?”

I appreciate your thoughts. -Steve

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Review

Note: NEHGS’s Register for Spring 2018 was released yesterday. We had hoped the quarterly would contain a review of our book, but found a notification of publication only. Even so, we are grateful to NEHGS for acknowledging the book, even though it was submitted to them so long after its publication. We also thank Terry for his suggestion and encouragement.

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Original Parish Registers to be Available Online

Findmypast recently announced that they will publish original Kent parish registers online. The Kent County Council is currently digitizing the records to be available exclusively on Findmypast sometime in 2018.

On May 22, Dick Eastman reported in Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter that a partnership between Findmypast and the Kent County Council will produce searchable collections from the early 1500’s to 1918 in high quality, full color images. It is estimated there will be over 2,500 handwritten parish registers of original baptism, banns, marriage and burials available through Findmypast, who is responsible for indexing, hosting and publishing with search and browse capability.

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Mary Haines (last of four parts)

Mary Knight Haines (Haynes/Hindes) and Ralph Dayton had been married a little over two years when Ralph died. The couple was still residing at North Sea (then called Northampton) when Mary was left in September of 1658. Ralph’s health had probably been declining since July, when he wrote his will. Continue reading

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Mary Haines (part three)

As the agreement states, Mary was to receive half the estate and her children were to receive the other half, according to its appraised value. Ralph then pointed out that much time had passed since the last inventory of the estate was recorded, so the court Continue reading

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Mary Haines (part two)

When John Herbert heard that Mary Haines was about to marry Ralph Dayton, he inquired what she would do for her children. Remember, common practice was to dispose the widow’s children when the widow married. As overseer, John Herbert knew that James had left nearly his entire estate to his wife and ownership of the estate would transfer to Ralph upon marriage. According to Charles Hoadly, Continue reading

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